Worthless Waffle, Writer's Mindset

How to find time to write with a full-time job?

Many of my friends and family don’t understand why I am still writing. After all, I finished university, got married, and snagged a full-time job. What more do I need? The creatives among us will have no difficulty rattling off a catalogue of needs that a job simply cannot fulfil. And I would happily plonk my signature under any such list – any time!

The deep, inner drive of the creative force within me makes my ordinary life unbearable at times. And the feeling that I don’t have the right to complain makes it at least ten times worse. Having my full-time job swallow my life is my biggest fear. The thought that I might die one day, with my stories still inside me, has me lying awake at night with a sprinkling of cold sweat on my brow.

Every glowing performance review kills a small part of my soul. Because each time somebody tells me that I am good at my job, the thought of leaving all this behind one day becomes scarier. And the possibility that my writing might one day pay my bills (if I’m lucky) seems more and more ridiculous the older I get.

So, I do all I can to fight the demons. This week the demons are full of strength and I feel weak. But I still have a choice. I can give up and let the demons win (in which case my worst-case scenario is certain). Or I can write. As long as I write there is a chance. A tiny spark of hope.

I am not going to sugarcoat things for you. Writing alongside a full-time job is HARD. Maybe the hardest thing I have ever done. It requires time management and the willingness to let bad writing happen. Don’t be afraid to write rubbish now and edit another day. Work out if you are a morning person or a night owl – then schedule your writing time accordingly. Make a realistic appointment with yourself..then show up. Otherwise you will be very frustrated.

In my twenties, I used to be a morning person with the ability to jump out of bed at 4:00am and get dressed by Disney birds. By the time I had to leave the house I would have already written at least 1000 words and feel like a rockstar. I miss that younger, more optimistic version of myself.

Now, in my thirties, I am a night owl. I no longer stress about writing early on in the day and accept that my most creative time will be at 9:00pm when I have done everything I need to do for the day (including my job, any housework, shopping, cooking, eating, tidying etc.)

When my reminder goes off, I go to my desk, write as much as I can for 2 hours and then go to bed. Some evenings I can write 1000 words, on others it’s closer to 10. But it’s my new routine and I wouldn’t change it for the world. It also means that I am able to produce 3 blog posts (including 1 flash fiction story) per week.

I make slow but steady progress on my debut novel (Fearful Magic) by chipping away at this enormous task. Just knowing I am getting closer to my goal and can write reliably is a big help when the demons show up. No matter what they say to me, I have some work to show.

The weekends are mostly for editing. On Saturdays I might still try to write (mostly outlines) but it’s usually less productive than when I write in the week. On Sunday evenings, I spend 1 hour planning ahead; including what scenes/ blog posts/ flash fiction to write next. I know it doesn’t sound glamorous…but it works.

See ya next time 😉

If you found this post insightful, have a great writing routine already, or are still looking for one, share your thoughts (and tips) in the comments below.

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