Scenes, Writing Process

How do you write your first draft?

If award winning author Joyce Carol Oates is to be believed, the answer to this question is: quickly! Write quickly and carelessly. Get it all out of your head and onto the page. Then revise as many times as it takes to realise your vision in a way that let’s your audience understand (and enjoy) it.

‘Write with the door closed.’ comes the advice from Stephen King who believes in total lockdown for your first draft and full disclosure for all following drafts. Write it all down first then start showing it to people as you revise and hope that some nuggets of wisdom will shake you out of your writing stupor, and overcome your already inflated writer’s ego so you can write a story somebody actually wants to read.

I have written many first, second, and even third (and fourth) drafts…but never a final one. Most likely that’s due to my inner critic who never sleeps and always has plenty to say. I also never write fast. So, this time around I am taking the advice of the masters. I am writing my first draft and I am going to write it as fast as I can and force myself not to re-read a single scene until all scenes have been drafted. Then I am going to take a break, read, catch-up on all the Netflix shows I missed whilst in my writing stupor. After a few weeks, I’ll pick up my first draft and start turning it into a second.

In this spirit, I decided that the best way to get me to write fast is to participate in #NanoWriMo. It’s unlikely that 50,000 words will be enough words to cover my first draft but if I get to 50,000 by the end of November, I’ll have written 50,000 more words than I would have written if I let me inner critic nag away at me. As far as I can tell, the secret to first draft writing is just to start and worry about the quality later.

The first scene of my debut novel ‘Fearful Magic’ is already written and whilst I can’t guarantee that it will exist in the final published version, here is a sneak peak into my rough writing (pre-any editing)…for those of you who want to know if I am really sticking to what I am saying in this blog post.

See ya next time 😉

If you have a better idea for first draft writing, agree/ disagree with the advice I have used for my current first draft, love/ hate or have other strong feelings about my first draft scene, leave a reply in the comments below.

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Structure, Writing Process

How do you choose which scenes to write?

It’s fun to come up with scenes – isn’t it? I don’t know how you feel about this statement but I would have vehemently started shaking my head if anybody had said this to me a few months ago. Working out what should happen in each scene and deciding which scenes to write and which scenes to cut from my outline used to be my kryptonite!

Luckily this changed recently when I discovered the story grid by Shawn Coyne (a tool for editing books that can also be used to help writers – provided they like to plan ahead). If this has piqued your interested, I have good news: Shawn lets you download the spreadsheet template for free from his website!

Whilst the template is really helpful for working out much of the plot and how it spreads across your scenes, including values, objectives, characters, the passing of time in your story (and much more), In my opinion there is a crucial bit missing – the why!

I found it really hard to populate a detailed template without having first understood what the function of each scene needs to be to make the story make sense (and keep things interesting). So, I made a little modification to the template as per the following excerpt which shows the first two scenes in my #NaNoWriMo 2020 story/ debut novel ‘Fearful Magic’ (yay! title-reveal!) as they currently appear on my #preptober story grid.

SCENEWORD COUNTSCENE PURPOSESTORY EVENT
1tbcIntroduce the protagonist and make the reader care for her.Elaine is going about her daily chores when she senses a bird being shot with an arrow. She goes outside to see the bird fall into the back garden of the house she calls home. Her ‘mother’ witnesses this event and flies into a wild panic. She urges Elaine to leave but Elaine refuses to go anywhere without an explanation. She goes to hide in the root cellar under the house when they hear a knock on the door.
2tbcConfirm the danger is real and demonstrate Elaine’s magic powers, showing she is not in control of these powers.The hunters arrive at the house, looking for their bird. They become suspicious when they discover multiple footprints in the snow and discover Elaine in the root cellar. They threaten Elaine’s ‘mother’ to force Elaine to disclose the whereabouts of a mage whom the hunters are after. Elaine unwittingly unleashes her deadly powers, then blacks out.

This way, I have an overview of the function of each scene, can see if the story events (or plot points) fulfil the scenes’ purpose and tweak (or cut) scenes if they don’t live up to their purpose.

I hope this little insight into my #preptober work has wet your appetite for this brand new fantasy story. I will be excited to share more about my writing process throughout November as I will be aiming to complete my first draft during #NaNoWriMo!

See ya next time 😉

Let me know if you are also participating in #NaNoWriMo this year (and what your #preptober prep looks like) by leaving a reply in the comments below.

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Plot, Structure, Writing Process

Write scenes – not chapters!

Before you bite my head off for the contentious title of this post – let me explain. There is actually a really important distinction between a scene and a chapter which I only recently understood and it changed my outlook on writing.

A scene is a sequence of story actions taken by characters within your story. A chapter is a collection of scenes. How many scenes go into a chapter is mostly an arbitrary decision by the writer/ editor/ publisher.

If you bear this in mind, it becomes easy to see why writing in chapters might cause problems for a writer. How can you divvy up scenes into chapters when you haven’t written those scenes first and don’t know how many words are in each of them? Chapters are there for the reader. But for a writer, scenes are your friends.

Following this logic, I am committed to writing all of my stories in scenes and it’s working wonders for coming up with the right sequence of events as it becomes easy to see where there might be gaps in the plot.

See ya next time 😉

If you are also a fan of writing in scenes rather than chapters or if writing in chapters works better for you, leave a reply in the comments below.

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