Fiction, Flash Fiction

FLASH FICTION: A Game of Runes

The game was rigged, Cassia knew. Designed to test the strengths of the hopeless, and break the weak. No chance of success. Only thoughtful, strategic failure was an option. The game was exclusively reserved for men.

Cassia threw a glance at the present king who was stuffed into his throne at the edge of the arena. His grey skin was flabby and wrinkled. There was something unsettling about how it folded in on itself around his neck. A snow-white, wispy cloud of a beard fluttered around his chin as he took one labored breath after another. The Game Master stepped forward.

“Defeat is a skill. All future kings of Iruzar must possess it. Only he who can fail five-fold is worthy of the crown. Today we shall find King Ormont’s successor.”

Cassia flinched. There was no turning back now. She pulled the hood of her black cloak deeper into her face. The rough fabric scratched her forehead as she did her best to conceal the mark on her neck. It was the only thing that distinguished her from the male players.

The gates were closed and the Game Master spun the gyroscope of fates. For the first time, a woman had entered the arena; albeit in secret. Cassia swallowed hard as the gyroscope finally came to a standstill.

“The fates have chosen the runes! A game of runes to test those who fancy themselves the next king!”

The Game Master plucked a piece of polished peridot from a chain on his neck. He kissed it gently, then threw it up into the air. It flew high at first, then stuck; hovering above the center of the game arena. A shrill voice erupted from the glowing gem; announcing the rules of the game.

“The runes can never be moved. The runes can never be touched. The runes can never be read. Only the runes hold the answer. The players must try to win. The last to fail will die. Six players, five rounds, one survivor. One king.”

“One king!” cheered the crowd.

Cassia could feel the ground vibrate under her feet. Guilian was the first to die. He touched the runes. An accident. The searing ray of peridot light hit him right between the eyes and burned a hole into his skull.

Player two died as quickly as the first; Aurelion. Nobody would remember his name.

Round three passed in a haze. Cassia came close to deciphering the runes. A close call. The peridot ray singed her cloak as it shot out at Marcellus.

Round four passed in silence. Cassia was the first to lose. A stroke of luck!

One last round, Cassia reminded herself. She was facing only Gilbert now; a dark soul and King Ormont’s ward. The dance began a final time. Gilbert and Cassia circled the runes. One more reach, Cassia thought. As her hand went out towards the runes, Gilbert’s arm shot forward. He had been watching her. He suspected.

Cassia held her breath as her black hood was torn backwards. A collective gasp went through the crowd as the mark of womanhood sparkled in the sunlight. Cassia looked around. Even the old king had heaved himself out of his seat. Tears stung her eyes as the peridot ray rushed towards her. It hit in the centre of her chest and passed through her like glass. Cassia felt no pain.

The crowd watched in shock as the peridot ray, subverted by Cassia’s body, hit Gilbert. The mark on Cassia’s neck glowed green. She was unharmed. It was a game designed for men, after all.

A note for creators:
This flash fiction work is subject to the following license: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)

Attribution — You must give appropriate credit, to ‘Josie Cole (@josiecolewrites)’, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses your use.

See ya next time 😉

If you have enjoyed this flash fiction piece, I would love to hear about it in the comments below. If you adapt this for your own creative project, feel free to post a link to your project or website.

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Fiction, Flash Fiction, Story

FLASH FICTION: Mythless

She sat on her throne; unmoved for centuries. A queen without a court. A goddess without believers. The faint echoes of worship past floated before her whilst drip after drip of rainwater fell from the ruined ceiling into a puddle at her feet. These were the forgotten lands. And she was forgotten with them.

Her eyes were made of polished glass; masterpieces. Results of a craft long dead. Almost alert, the irises shone with golden color, imitating life as they reflected the weak light of day. Thick coils of thorny growth were interwoven with the regal statue. One long arm of neglect to hold her prisoner, it seemed.

What a shame, the wanderer thought. He was young yet. Lost, cold and wet he had entered the deserted castle. Lost, cold and wet, he remained. No stories had warned him of this place. Nobody had lived to tell the tale. And so he didn’t know what cruel mistress had bid him to this one-sided audience. He never saw the golden irises follow his every move as he scouted around the throne room for a dry corner to sleep.

In the end, there was only a rasp and a venomous sting of thorns.

A note for creators:
This flash fiction work is subject to the following license: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)

Attribution — You must give appropriate credit, to ‘Josie Cole (@josiecolewrites)’, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses your use.

See ya next time 😉

If you have enjoyed this flash fiction piece, I would love to hear about it in the comments below. If you adapt this for your own creative project, feel free to post a link to your project or website.

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Book Shelf, Fiction, Worthless Waffle

Should you re-read fiction books? (Reread Tag)

For once, I have spent my weekend well and, as a result, I am all written out! So I decided to go easy on myself and try a tag instead of an original post. I came across this particular one on Zeezee with Books and thought I would chime in with my own recommendations. The Reread Tag was created by Brianna at Brianna’s Books and Randomness and I will be forever grateful to her for coming up with this.

The tag raises a very important question for me: should you re-read fiction books? Is it more than a simple, guilty pleasure? Or it is it perfectly pointless? I am using the tag to explore this question in light of the fiction books I would happily re-read (and in light of those I’d happily bin).

Here goes:

A childhood favourite that you could read 100 times and still love
My pick for the first category is by now a well-known, modern classic: The Northern Lights by Philip Pullman was the first full-length novel I ever read. I was 9 and it took me a year! And even after all the years that have passed since I read it, I continue to want to re-read it and find new and exciting details in this magical tale. This story made me want to be a writer. It will stay with me all my life.

Northern Lights
by Philip Pullman
(His Dark Materials, Book 1)

A book you DNF’d but would be willing to give a second chance to
I know this revelation might shock some of you given my obsession with magic and witchcraft which drives pretty much all my writing. But for some reason my first encounter with this series wasn’t all that it was cracked up to be. I was a student at University and bought a frayed copy of A Discovery of Witches by Deborah Harkness in an Oxfam charity shop. I took it back to my grubby accommodation, had it sit on my bedside table for 3 months, read the first few chapters, felt that a witch and a vampire attending a yoga class together wasn’t my thing and then donated it back to the same charity shop where I had originally bought it. Luckily the very excellent TV show got me back into the story and now I am totally hooked on the boxset.

A Discovery of Witches
by Deborah Harkness
(All Souls, Book 1)

A newer favorite you would reread
I first heard about Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell from the Richard and Judy Book Club. I know this will mean nothing to my international friends, but here in the UK, Richard and Judy are kind of a big deal and their book recommendations sell millions of copies. Another big reason for why I bought this book was a discussion of this on the radio and the story sounded so incredibly interesting that I simply couldn’t help myself. But as is often the case with books that are hyped up in the media, I had a hard time matching my actual reading experience with my imagined reading experience. Also, the episodic nature of the individual chapters kind of threw me as this was not among the things that the media zoomed in on. However, as much as reading this book felt like a chore the first time around, I can now appreciate it differently. In retrospect, all the tenuous little links between chapters that were so well brought out in the movie, really stand out. Re-reading this book is a real joy and I have done this twice so far with re-read number three firmly scheduled for 2021.

Cloud Atlas
by David Mitchell

A book you hated and never want to read again
So there are those books that need more than one chance…and there are others where even one chance feels overly generous. The Ship by Antonia Honeywell definitely falls into the latter category, in my view. What a shame! I bought a copy of this book completely cold and with great excitement. The reviews on the cover were just what I hoped for in a book of dystopian fiction. The subject matter was right up my street, the characters were strong and interesting. So where did it all fall apart? For me, it was the plot. The setup made a great promise that was never kept. Once people made it onto the ship, they were all overcome by ennui (and so was I). People did what people do…on a ship at the end of the world. They fight, they have sex, they have poor judgement. When the final twist FINALLY came, I was ready to throw this book into the nearest bonfire. Ended up donating it to a charity book sale at work. Good riddance!

The Ship
by Antonia Honeywell

A classic you read in school but want to try again
Based on the movie, Dead Poets Society by Nancy H. Kleinbaum is easily the best book I ever had to read for school…and as somebody who loved reading (even for school)…that’s saying a lot! If you have never read it, you must! Even if it’s just for a glimpse of what creative people get out of their creative activities. To me, this book/ movie holds the key to understanding why people create. It perfectly demonstrates the way in which the act of creation opens a portal into another world through which an artist, writer, performer, etc. can escape their dreary existence at least for a small amount of time. This story shows how art makes life bearable and how unbearable life would be without it. A beautiful movie made into a beautiful book.

Dead Poets Society
by Nancy H. Kleinbaum
Screenplay: Tom Schulman

An author you would reread anything from
Gosh, you guys…what a question! Surprisingly, the answer to this was really easy for me. The author from whom I would happily re-read anything (and whose new books I would buy without hesitation and without even reading the blurb) is the wonderfully imaginative artist-author Audrey Niffenegger. Her books are dark, complex, rich in detail and imagination and they might not be for everybody. In the case of The Time Traveler’s Wife, the story can feel convoluted and confusing. But if you are willing to trust the author, and follow the trail of breadcrumbs that are so cleverly strewn throughout the book, you will find yourself in the middle of a wonderful, eccentric adventure that will make you laugh, shudder, question, and bawl your eyes out at times. The strongest writer of magical realism I have ever encountered.

A series you want to reread for the fun of it
Call me a soppy old traditionalist, but when it comes to epic fantasy, I am all in favour of studying and re-reading the works of the uncontested master of the genre. These books blew my away years before the movies were ever announced. Reading this series was like being soaked in mystical cultures, languages, believes, and adventures. I can’t think of another series I would re-read for the pure joy of reading. With so much detail, there is always more to learn and explore. The next time I have time to disappear into a series (this usually only happens around Christmas) this will be top of my list. Always a pleasure!

Lord of the Rings
(3-Book-Collection)
by J.R.R. Tolkien

A book you’ve read but want to listen to the audiobook
I am a massive fan of audio books – just not when it comes to fiction. I love learning new things when listening to non-fiction self-help books on Audible (the audio book subscription service of my choice) whilst ridding my house of cobwebs, dust, and grime (or whilst folding the laundry)…adulting sucks! Interestingly, I don’t find it easy to listen to fiction. This is mainly because I often don’t like the readers. Unless it’s read by the author (Neil Gaiman has an amazing voice), Stephen Fry, or at least has a narrator whose voice matches the mood of the story, I am generally not interested. So I can’t really tell you which of the books I already read would be among my audio book choices as it tends to be either or. So let me recommend my favourite fiction audio book from my audible collection. It’s Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman…read by Neil Gaiman…6 hrs and 50 minutes well-spent.

Norse Mythology
by Neil Gaiman
Narrated by Neil Gaiman

So, where does this leave us? Is there a point to re-reading fiction? I hope that we have all reached the same conclusion by now. Re-reading fiction books has its merits…as long as you pick the right books to re-read. The list is different for everybody but if you know why you loved a book or why it changed you/ your life, you can go back and re-read the same book countless times and still never cease to learn from it.

See ya next time 😉

If you have enjoyed this tag, and decide to try this on your own blog or website, please remember to link back to this post. Reading other people’s answers to these questions is more than half the fun of the Reread Tag. Happy reading to any of you who might take me up on any of my recommendations and don’t be too shy to respond to any of them in the comments below.

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