Plot, Scenes, Structure, Writing Process

Is it OK to stray from your outline?

A prime question among writers! If you are a dedicated plotter (like me), you will appreciate the many upsides to having a detailed outline for your novel, short-story, work of non-fiction (or whatever else you are writing). You will know the feeling of sitting down to write with a good idea of what events, characters, scenery, etc. you need to put on the page and therefore be able give the finger (or two) to any #creativeblock that may be waiting in the wings to derail your progress – most days.

Then there are those writers (and if you are one of these, I am profusely jealous) who like to fly by the seat of their pants, discovering the story, characters, events, and scenery as they go. ‘Pantsers’ hate outlining and I get why. If you are not a plotter this post is not for you. This is for the writers who struggle to write without a map – welcome friends!

Eight scenes into my #NaNoWriMo project (Fearful Magic), I am not surprised to find that the scenes I have down so far are not the same eight scenes that fill spaces one to eight on my story grid outline. Creativity just works it’s magic that way. Once my fingers start flying over the keyboard, the unexpected happens and I let it…gladly.

First draft writing is not science. It’s a dark art. It’s perfectly fine to stray from your outline, especially during the writing of the first draft which is really about finding the right tone for the work and building the framework upon which to improve upon later. The only important thing is to make sure that you meet the key milestones of your story. So, a lose following of your outline is absolutely OK. I would say, it’s essential to ensure that you don’t get fed up with your story before it’s written.

There is always more to discover and you will never be able to come up with all the scenes up front. Does this mean outlining is a waste of time. NO! Of course not! The outline is there to get you writing. Once the writing is happening, do as you will. Once you don your editor hat you can amend your outline where necessary, then re-read, revise, re-think all aspects of your first draft…until your vision comes to life.

See ya next time 😉

If you have trouble following your outline, get frustrated with your creativity taking you down unexpected paths and alleys, or haven’t cracked this outlining thing at all, leave a reply in the comments below and share your experience.

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Scenes, Writing Process

How do you write your first draft?

If award winning author Joyce Carol Oates is to be believed, the answer to this question is: quickly! Write quickly and carelessly. Get it all out of your head and onto the page. Then revise as many times as it takes to realise your vision in a way that let’s your audience understand (and enjoy) it.

‘Write with the door closed.’ comes the advice from Stephen King who believes in total lockdown for your first draft and full disclosure for all following drafts. Write it all down first then start showing it to people as you revise and hope that some nuggets of wisdom will shake you out of your writing stupor, and overcome your already inflated writer’s ego so you can write a story somebody actually wants to read.

I have written many first, second, and even third (and fourth) drafts…but never a final one. Most likely that’s due to my inner critic who never sleeps and always has plenty to say. I also never write fast. So, this time around I am taking the advice of the masters. I am writing my first draft and I am going to write it as fast as I can and force myself not to re-read a single scene until all scenes have been drafted. Then I am going to take a break, read, catch-up on all the Netflix shows I missed whilst in my writing stupor. After a few weeks, I’ll pick up my first draft and start turning it into a second.

In this spirit, I decided that the best way to get me to write fast is to participate in #NanoWriMo. It’s unlikely that 50,000 words will be enough words to cover my first draft but if I get to 50,000 by the end of November, I’ll have written 50,000 more words than I would have written if I let me inner critic nag away at me. As far as I can tell, the secret to first draft writing is just to start and worry about the quality later.

The first scene of my debut novel ‘Fearful Magic’ is already written and whilst I can’t guarantee that it will exist in the final published version, here is a sneak peak into my rough writing (pre-any editing)…for those of you who want to know if I am really sticking to what I am saying in this blog post.

See ya next time 😉

If you have a better idea for first draft writing, agree/ disagree with the advice I have used for my current first draft, love/ hate or have other strong feelings about my first draft scene, leave a reply in the comments below.

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