Fiction, Flash Fiction, Story

FLASH FICTION: Mythless

She sat on her throne; unmoved for centuries. A queen without a court. A goddess without believers. The faint echoes of worship past floated before her whilst drip after drip of rainwater fell from the ruined ceiling into a puddle at her feet. These were the forgotten lands. And she was forgotten with them.

Her eyes were made of polished glass; masterpieces. Results of a craft long dead. Almost alert, the irises shone with golden color, imitating life as they reflected the weak light of day. Thick coils of thorny growth were interwoven with the regal statue. One long arm of neglect to hold her prisoner, it seemed.

What a shame, the wanderer thought. He was young yet. Lost, cold and wet he had entered the deserted castle. Lost, cold and wet, he remained. No stories had warned him of this place. Nobody had lived to tell the tale. And so he didn’t know what cruel mistress had bid him to this one-sided audience. He never saw the golden irises follow his every move as he scouted around the throne room for a dry corner to sleep.

In the end, there was only a rasp and a venomous sting of thorns.

A note for creators:
This flash fiction work is subject to the following license: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)

Attribution — You must give appropriate credit, to ‘Josie Cole (@josiecolewrites)’, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses your use.

See ya next time 😉

If you have enjoyed this flash fiction piece, I would love to hear about it in the comments below. If you adapt this for your own creative project, feel free to post a link to your project or website.

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Author Business, Fiction, Writing Process

Eight rules for writing fiction that you should definitely break!

Yes, yes…you’re right. There are definitely more than eight rules when it comes to writing fiction; especially in the realm of the fantasy genres (and sub-genres). But I found this article in The New Yorker (from 2013) and it strikes me that the eight rules they picked for their article are eight that I definitely break often…without breaking my stories!

In the wild west of indie publishing it might be tempting for new authors to launch into their projects thinking one of two things:

A. That you have to follow ALL the rules known to fiction authors.
OR
B. That you have to follow NONE of the rules known to fiction authors.

Neither approach has my recommendation. If you follow each and every rule you have ever heard about fiction writing, you are most likely going to end up with a stale piece of prose that will be so rigid and structured (and flat) that nobody will want to read it…unless they are a special kind of individual who likes to torment themselves!

On the other hand, if you follow none of the rules you have ever heard about fiction writing, you are most likely going to end up with a wild, unstructured beast of a story that will fail to provide any useful reference points to your readers. Your fiction will evade all tropes and genre conventions and be of use to nobody. Some rules are good! But I don’t think those are the eight rules hailed by The New Yorker…

Here are my recommendations about the eight rules mentioned in their article…which is published in the humour and cartoons section of their website (although this is not necessarily clear if you come in via google results as it’s categorised as ‘daily shouts’ rather than ‘satire’):

Show, don’t tell.

The New Yorker, Eight Rules for Writing Fiction, by Teddy Wayne, 6 June 2013

Yes we heard it many times. Show don’t tell is where it’s at. Don’t write your story like a manual for household appliances (seriously, please don’t do that)! But you can’t show everything without messing up your pacing, narrative voice, style, and general appeal. So here’s my version of this rule for the modern fiction writer of 2021: show when you can and tell when you can’t. Choose wisely.

Create three-dimensional characters.

The New Yorker, Eight Rules for Writing Fiction, by Teddy Wayne, 6 June 2013

This one tickled me the most! The article literally advises fiction writers to avoid cliché character descriptions by telling your reader how long, wide, and girthy some hard-charging banker character is…as he drives around in his flashy sports car… oh my! You want to avoid cliché character descriptions? Write down the clichés you know of and then find innovative ways of describing the character traits to move you away from the overused descriptions.

I am not saying YOUR version of the hard-charging banker has to be a slim, unicorn riding, sugarplum fairy with delicate wings…but how about not describing the character as ‘hard-charging’ to start with? And what if your banker character was secretly uncomfortable with driving a sports car but too afraid to show it? Wouldn’t that be a lot more interesting than learning about his measurements in 3 dimensions?

Choose a point of view.

The New Yorker, Eight Rules for Writing Fiction, by Teddy Wayne, 6 June 2013

Sounds like good advice – doesn’t it? After all you don’t want to end up head hopping and confusing your readers…? Sure, but there is a problem with this rule which is why I often break it. The point of view from which your story needs to be told is not arbitrary. Depending on what information you need to convey to your readers/ characters to conclude your story, every writer who has ever written themselves into a corner without escape (I have done this many times), will have experienced what happens when you choose the wrong point of view.

First person narrators are a popular choice in YA Fantasy and SciFi fiction but this only really works well if your protagonist has the freedom or opportunity to access every place, character, and knowledge that is essential for moving your plot past all of the crucial landmarks in your story.

Otherwise you might end up having to invent ‘magical’ phenomena, additional characters, work miracles (not very satisfying for your readers), or constantly rework your plot to get out of those pesky corners. You’re not really choosing a point of view…you are matchmaking your point of view with the story you want to tell. Work out what your story needs and learn to use the relevant point of view to your advantage…instead of to your detriment.

Give your characters motivations.

The New Yorker, Eight Rules for Writing Fiction, by Teddy Wayne, 6 June 2013

Now this is among the most problematic pieces of advice in the fiction world. You are led to believe that if you can work out what your characters(s) want(s) you can come up with a great, engaging plot for your story that will have the readers turn the pages to the very end. But have you read any of those stories that are primarily driven by characters’ wants? I have! And they bored me to tears.

One wants cupcakes. Another wants to be with somebody else’s spouse. The next wants power. It’s just what they want. But there is no reason why! I firmly believe that it’s not enough for a character to want something. Whatever it is the character strives for, he/ she/ they must need it.

Think about Frodo from Lord of the Rings. Do you think he just wants the ring? Does he just want to own it? Does he just want its power? If you need to remind yourself, go ahead, I think you’ll find that what Frodo feels in relation to the ring runs much deeper than want. Frodo needs it. The ring calls to him. He is drawn in and becomes increasingly obsessed (or possessed – you choose) by it. Giving it up is painful. Unthinkable.

Figure out what your characters need! And don’t forget that your antagonist must need something that conflicts with what your protagonist needs – otherwise they’re on the same side.

Write what you know. 

The New Yorker, Eight Rules for Writing Fiction, by Teddy Wayne, 6 June 2013

Oh dear. Another overrated piece of fiction writing advice. Please don’t write what you know. It gets boring pretty quickly. I spent years trying to write a novel about what I know and it has resulted in some of the worst stories I have ever written! Everything you know is already so close to you that you will have difficulty writing about it in a fresh and interesting way. Instead, write what you love to read! In my case that’s YA Fantasy (mainly high fantasy).

Find what rocks your socks as a reader…and then write a story within that genre. Write a story you would love to read that is full of the type of characters, plots twists, and conventions that make you love your favourite genre. Chances are it will be well received by readers who like what you like. Be your own ideal reader. It works! Everything else can be researched.

No tears for the writer, no tears for the reader. 

The New Yorker, Eight Rules for Writing Fiction, by Teddy Wayne, 6 June 2013

Problems getting emotional when you are writing? Me too. Does this mean that our readers can’t be moved by our writing? I hardly think so. Comments on my work suggest otherwise. I think this point was thrown into the original article to allow for some comic relief but I really don’t believe this to be valid at all – humorous intention or not.

No need to go slice onions…just have your writing read back to you to check the reader experience. A lot of the emotional response from readers comes from an element of surprise, coupled with effective foreshadowing. As a writer, make sure your works sounds right and that you have the correct setup for the emotion you wish to incite in your readers. The rest is just gimmicks!

Revize, revize, revize.

The New Yorker, Eight Rules for Writing Fiction, by Teddy Wayne, 6 June 2013

I know this might seem like I am being contentious on purpose. But hear me out. Revising your work is a good thing! Every writer’s output needs an edit (or two, or three). What your work definitely doesn’t need, though, is a perfectionist maniac author who is so worked up over the possibility of releasing anything into the world that might feature the tiniest flaw that they never release anything at all.

All stories have flaws. A determined critic can poke holes into just about anything (just look at me picking apart The New Yorker article over here). Here’s the rule you need: write, edit, revise, proofread, then publish. Get your story into the hands of readers (at least beta ones), collect feedback and make your next story better. Write, write, write and ship!

Trust yourself.

The New Yorker, Eight Rules for Writing Fiction, by Teddy Wayne, 6 June 2013

Yes and no. If you are writing what you love to read and your story is shaping up to be the kind of book YOU would buy, chances are good that you are on the right track! But please don’t forget that the question is: does this work of fiction read like the books I love to read? Rather than: do I think the story ideas are similar to other books I have read in this genre? Trust yourself as a reader but beware of your writer-self.

You have to be honest with yourself. Is the quality of our writing comparable to the books you love to read? If the answer is no (or if you’re unsure) listen to your beta readers…by which I mean other people who love to read what you love to read. Be unemotional (I know this is hard) but don’t assume people will love your story just because it’s the right type of story. It also has to look, feel, and read like other stories in the genre and that takes a whole lot of skill. Keep learning.

See ya next time 😉

If you have enjoyed this post and are curious what a story that breaks all these fiction writing rules might look like, have a look at my one-shot YA Fantasy story ‘Shadow Play’ (for free). As always, comments, feedback and further thoughts on this post are welcome. Please share in the comments.

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Author Business, Self-Publishing

Can free text-to-speech software save your self-publishing budget?

I am slightly biased when it comes to anything technology (my day-job involves horizon scanning for technological solutions in a large organisation) and it never fails to amaze me how many of the most boring and menial tasks can now be done faster and easier with the help of advanced tools. So, I recently had a brainwave when it comes to improving my writing and my proofreading – for free! – and I thought that you might be interested in trying this, too.

If you are thinking about self-publishing, or if you have already got some experience with this, you might have discovered that self-publishing can be expensive. Especially if you want to put out quality products (i.e. books). No, I am NOT suggesting that you use free text-to-speech software to help turn your books into audio books. But I AM suggesting that this type of software can be make you a better writer. And it will cost you nothing at all.

How is this possible, you ask? It’s all down to one little fact that we writers already know: it’s impossible to proofread yourself. Everyone who has tried it will undoubtedly have come across the problem of missing words (‘be’, ‘a’, ‘the’, are common problems), duplication (‘the the’ and ‘a a’ are my personal faves), and a general issue with spelling and grammar (don’t get me started on this one).

If I am telling you that the culprit of such problems is the human brain, your eyes will probably roll right into the back of your head. But this is exactly why technology is an excellent solution. Software is dumb! It doesn’t have thoughts, it doesn’t assume, doesn’t understand words that are misspelled, doesn’t block out duplicate words, and it most certainly doesn’t fill in words that are not actually there.

So, dropping a paragraph of your text into a free text-to-speech online tool (Natural Readers is my tool of choice), helps you beat your overly helpful brain! It lets you hear your writing as it will come across to your reader and you will hear if your sentences are overly long, and whether your narrative flows…or not. You will hear every misspelled word (because the software won’t be able to pronounce it) and you will be alerted to all missing and duplicate words.

I recently used this to edit a one-shot YA Fantasy story and the feedback I had on this from readers was so much better than I could ever have anticipated.
My favourite comment on this story claims:
This is one the most well written stories that I’ve read on here [Wattpad]! So much passion in so few words! I commend you! : )

See ya next time 😉

If you give this approach to self-editing and proofreading a try, share your experience in the comments below. Links to your stories on the web are also welcome! Have a great week.

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Fiction, Flash Fiction

FLASH FICTION: A Traveler’s Tale

The Traveler was tall and dusty. Golden particles swirled around him. Time moved slowly in his presence. His left leg dragged on the floor as he walked into the empty saloon; stiff as a broomstick. The bartender was struggling to interpret the Traveler’s facial expression. He had seen many faces but few that betrayed so little of what went on behind the surface. The eyes were young but the skin was dry and tough. Deep wrinkles ran across the Traveler’s forehead and from both sides of his nose down to his square, beardless jaw. They looked like they had been cut into his face with a blunt knife.

“Drink?”

The Traveler nodded. “Rum. Dark.”

The bartender’s hand shook as he poured two fingers worth of the best they had. He had a habit to shove the glass over to the customers across the sticky bar but something stopped him this time. Instead, he simply nodded to the Traveler who was in no hurry to reach out.

“You’ve come far?”

The Traveler’s stare was cold; hostile.

“You’re looking for a story, mate?”

The bartender was lost for words. He didn’t know whether he should agree or apologize. Neither seemed safe.

“Life’s not exciting enough in here, mate?”

The bartender retreated from the bar. With his back against the wall, he stared at the Traveler with wide, open eyes. He still couldn’t speak.

“Alright, then. Let’s tell a story, mate.”

The Traveler reached into one of the many pockets that were sewn into his tattered coat. The bartender was surprised to see that instead of a gun or knife he pulled out a titanium compass. It looked heavy and was large enough to fill the Traveler’s palm. Golden particles seemed to emanate from the compass.

“Once upon a time, a young man yearned for an adventure. He was warned of dangers…but…he didn’t listen.”

The needle of the compass began to spin, picking up maddening speed and humming like a swarm of bumblebees.

“He wanted power. The power that comes from seeing the world. He didn’t know it then but there is no power in travel…just slavery. Time is a cruel master. Can’t manipulate it. Only a one-way street. But you’ll know it soon enough, mate. You’ll see. You’ll feel it soon.”

An impossible wind was blowing around the two men. The bartender thought about crouching down on the floor but he couldn’t move. He was pinned to the wall behind him. The golden particles formed a small tornado around the compass. Then, they started to move towards the bartender.

“You’ll feel it soon.”

The particles surrounded the bartender. They swirled around his head. The bartender tried to scream but his throat was too dry. He could only stare in horror as the particles forced their way through his nostrils and windpipe. He could feel them buzzing within his aching lungs. The Traveler watched emotionlessly as the bartender combusted into a cloud of gold particles. Then, he finally reached for the rum.

“Have a good trip, mate.” he mumbled.

A note for creators:
This flash fiction work is subject to the following license: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)

Attribution — You must give appropriate credit, to ‘Josie Cole (@josiecolewrites)’, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses your use.

See ya next time 😉

If you have enjoyed this flash fiction piece, I would love to hear about it in the comments below. If you adapt this for your own creative project, feel free to post a link to your project or website.

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Plot, Story, Story Arc, Structure, Writing Process

How to know when your book is finished?

Even though this will drive you all crazy, I will have to say it anyway: a story should only be as long as it needs to be. That’s it. The end, see you next time…ah but wait! Didn’t I say this post was about how you know when a story is finished? Well, I suppose, every writer sooner or later comes to a point in their story where they have to ask themselves: to end or not to end?…THAT is the question!

And it’s not always obvious…even to the most seasoned of writers! For one, anybody here ever read The Green Mile by Stephen King? No? Then you better get on it! It’s a great book…apart from the lengthy waffle at the end of the book that goes well past where I felt it should have ended. No obligation for anybody here to agree with me, but if you have read it, I would be curious if you came away with the same feeling…that the book could have come to a close much sooner than it did.

So, every time I write a story, I try to start with the end in mind…even if I only have a vague idea. Because at least it will help me not to overshoot my goal. Easy to say if you’re a plotter (which I am). Although, I think that even for the pantsers among us at least a grain of an idea as to where the story should end could be of benefit.

My flash fiction writing (although I only started this recently) is already paying off in this arena. First of all, I am getting to finish a lot more stories which means that I am getting some practice recognising the natural finish point. And secondly, I am learning to fit my story into a specific word count (I try to keep my flash fiction around 300 words). So when I write longer, I can better gauge how many words I need to write to finish the story.

If I reach the word count for my story and my planned ending hasn’t happened yet, I know I have too much waffle and too little action in my story. If my planned ending happens far from the planned word count, I have a good indicator that my story lacks detail and might be too jumpy or sudden and I can go back and insert more scenes to give the reader more information about the characters and the world.

My writing style is very action driven and I sometimes lack the patience to describe much of the world, places, and characters in my story. Writing long is a real challenge for me but getting to a pacey first draft and then revising to make sure I have enough material for the story I want to write is a good strategy for me.

See ya next time 😉

If you recognise any of your own issues in this post, have trouble finishing a story in time for your planned ending, have a good reason not to want to plan the ending of your stories, or are so good at ending your stories perfectly that your books are a shining beacon of hope to the rest of us, please share your views in the comments below.

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Book Shelf, Fiction, Worthless Waffle

Should you re-read fiction books? (Reread Tag)

For once, I have spent my weekend well and, as a result, I am all written out! So I decided to go easy on myself and try a tag instead of an original post. I came across this particular one on Zeezee with Books and thought I would chime in with my own recommendations. The Reread Tag was created by Brianna at Brianna’s Books and Randomness and I will be forever grateful to her for coming up with this.

The tag raises a very important question for me: should you re-read fiction books? Is it more than a simple, guilty pleasure? Or it is it perfectly pointless? I am using the tag to explore this question in light of the fiction books I would happily re-read (and in light of those I’d happily bin).

Here goes:

A childhood favourite that you could read 100 times and still love
My pick for the first category is by now a well-known, modern classic: The Northern Lights by Philip Pullman was the first full-length novel I ever read. I was 9 and it took me a year! And even after all the years that have passed since I read it, I continue to want to re-read it and find new and exciting details in this magical tale. This story made me want to be a writer. It will stay with me all my life.

Northern Lights
by Philip Pullman
(His Dark Materials, Book 1)

A book you DNF’d but would be willing to give a second chance to
I know this revelation might shock some of you given my obsession with magic and witchcraft which drives pretty much all my writing. But for some reason my first encounter with this series wasn’t all that it was cracked up to be. I was a student at University and bought a frayed copy of A Discovery of Witches by Deborah Harkness in an Oxfam charity shop. I took it back to my grubby accommodation, had it sit on my bedside table for 3 months, read the first few chapters, felt that a witch and a vampire attending a yoga class together wasn’t my thing and then donated it back to the same charity shop where I had originally bought it. Luckily the very excellent TV show got me back into the story and now I am totally hooked on the boxset.

A Discovery of Witches
by Deborah Harkness
(All Souls, Book 1)

A newer favorite you would reread
I first heard about Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell from the Richard and Judy Book Club. I know this will mean nothing to my international friends, but here in the UK, Richard and Judy are kind of a big deal and their book recommendations sell millions of copies. Another big reason for why I bought this book was a discussion of this on the radio and the story sounded so incredibly interesting that I simply couldn’t help myself. But as is often the case with books that are hyped up in the media, I had a hard time matching my actual reading experience with my imagined reading experience. Also, the episodic nature of the individual chapters kind of threw me as this was not among the things that the media zoomed in on. However, as much as reading this book felt like a chore the first time around, I can now appreciate it differently. In retrospect, all the tenuous little links between chapters that were so well brought out in the movie, really stand out. Re-reading this book is a real joy and I have done this twice so far with re-read number three firmly scheduled for 2021.

Cloud Atlas
by David Mitchell

A book you hated and never want to read again
So there are those books that need more than one chance…and there are others where even one chance feels overly generous. The Ship by Antonia Honeywell definitely falls into the latter category, in my view. What a shame! I bought a copy of this book completely cold and with great excitement. The reviews on the cover were just what I hoped for in a book of dystopian fiction. The subject matter was right up my street, the characters were strong and interesting. So where did it all fall apart? For me, it was the plot. The setup made a great promise that was never kept. Once people made it onto the ship, they were all overcome by ennui (and so was I). People did what people do…on a ship at the end of the world. They fight, they have sex, they have poor judgement. When the final twist FINALLY came, I was ready to throw this book into the nearest bonfire. Ended up donating it to a charity book sale at work. Good riddance!

The Ship
by Antonia Honeywell

A classic you read in school but want to try again
Based on the movie, Dead Poets Society by Nancy H. Kleinbaum is easily the best book I ever had to read for school…and as somebody who loved reading (even for school)…that’s saying a lot! If you have never read it, you must! Even if it’s just for a glimpse of what creative people get out of their creative activities. To me, this book/ movie holds the key to understanding why people create. It perfectly demonstrates the way in which the act of creation opens a portal into another world through which an artist, writer, performer, etc. can escape their dreary existence at least for a small amount of time. This story shows how art makes life bearable and how unbearable life would be without it. A beautiful movie made into a beautiful book.

Dead Poets Society
by Nancy H. Kleinbaum
Screenplay: Tom Schulman

An author you would reread anything from
Gosh, you guys…what a question! Surprisingly, the answer to this was really easy for me. The author from whom I would happily re-read anything (and whose new books I would buy without hesitation and without even reading the blurb) is the wonderfully imaginative artist-author Audrey Niffenegger. Her books are dark, complex, rich in detail and imagination and they might not be for everybody. In the case of The Time Traveler’s Wife, the story can feel convoluted and confusing. But if you are willing to trust the author, and follow the trail of breadcrumbs that are so cleverly strewn throughout the book, you will find yourself in the middle of a wonderful, eccentric adventure that will make you laugh, shudder, question, and bawl your eyes out at times. The strongest writer of magical realism I have ever encountered.

A series you want to reread for the fun of it
Call me a soppy old traditionalist, but when it comes to epic fantasy, I am all in favour of studying and re-reading the works of the uncontested master of the genre. These books blew my away years before the movies were ever announced. Reading this series was like being soaked in mystical cultures, languages, believes, and adventures. I can’t think of another series I would re-read for the pure joy of reading. With so much detail, there is always more to learn and explore. The next time I have time to disappear into a series (this usually only happens around Christmas) this will be top of my list. Always a pleasure!

Lord of the Rings
(3-Book-Collection)
by J.R.R. Tolkien

A book you’ve read but want to listen to the audiobook
I am a massive fan of audio books – just not when it comes to fiction. I love learning new things when listening to non-fiction self-help books on Audible (the audio book subscription service of my choice) whilst ridding my house of cobwebs, dust, and grime (or whilst folding the laundry)…adulting sucks! Interestingly, I don’t find it easy to listen to fiction. This is mainly because I often don’t like the readers. Unless it’s read by the author (Neil Gaiman has an amazing voice), Stephen Fry, or at least has a narrator whose voice matches the mood of the story, I am generally not interested. So I can’t really tell you which of the books I already read would be among my audio book choices as it tends to be either or. So let me recommend my favourite fiction audio book from my audible collection. It’s Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman…read by Neil Gaiman…6 hrs and 50 minutes well-spent.

Norse Mythology
by Neil Gaiman
Narrated by Neil Gaiman

So, where does this leave us? Is there a point to re-reading fiction? I hope that we have all reached the same conclusion by now. Re-reading fiction books has its merits…as long as you pick the right books to re-read. The list is different for everybody but if you know why you loved a book or why it changed you/ your life, you can go back and re-read the same book countless times and still never cease to learn from it.

See ya next time 😉

If you have enjoyed this tag, and decide to try this on your own blog or website, please remember to link back to this post. Reading other people’s answers to these questions is more than half the fun of the Reread Tag. Happy reading to any of you who might take me up on any of my recommendations and don’t be too shy to respond to any of them in the comments below.

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Flash Fiction

FLASH FICTION: Tea for Eternity

The future envisioned them. All six. Young girls; short and stocky. Unremarkable to say the least. Lost in the world, they were too ordinary to fit in. Too ordinary to stand out. They were invisible creatures, even to themselves. Hardly alive, hardly dead. Only the future knew their destiny. To the present, these girls were bone dry. The past hadn’t seen much of them, yet, but she would in good time.

“More tea?”

The present rolled her eyes, setting her empty china cup down on its saucer.

“Your skill to anticipate is exhausting. I don’t know why you even bother to ask. Don’t you know the answer?”

“I do.” replied the future, whilst filling the cup half full. “I even know exactly how many sips you will be taking from this half empty cup before you change your mind.”

The present let out a heavy sigh. Her gaze wandered over to her older sister now. No point arguing with the younger.

“I don’t know how you can bear it! Tea for eternity at this very table.”

“Oh I am not paying attention to that. All I need to know is right here in my memories.” She briefly tapped her left temple before taking up her needlework again.

“Ugh! Neither of you are even here! Your minds are elsewhere. It’s only me stuck drinking this mud!”

“Earl Grey.” the future chimed. “Would you like another blend for the next pot?”

“You haven’t complained about the tea before.” the past added unhelpfully, exacerbating the present’s dark mood.

“Enough! The both of you! I am sick of your tea. And what is your obsession with these boring girls?”

The future smiled. “You leave the future to me. All in good time.”

“One day you’ll see.” the past agreed.

In a wild rage, the present grabbed her cup with the intention to smash it against the wall but the future was already ahead of her.

“Release my arm!”

“In a few minutes when you are calm again.”

And so the hours passed. Each one worth a year in the human world. The present raged twice every hour but the future always anticipated and the past always remembered. Together the past and the future watched the girls grow up and, one day, they were all gone from view.

“What happened to the girls?” the present remarked one day in a calm moment.

“I don’t remember.” admitted the future. Her eyes were gazing at a young soldier. His future was sad.

“They died.” determined the past.

“And what happened before they died? Did they lead remarkable lives? Did they change?”

The past looked up from her needlework. Over the rim of her glasses, she shot a dark glance at her younger sister.

“You could have seen for yourself if you were patient enough.”

The future nodded. “More tea?”

A note for creators:
This flash fiction work is subject to the following license: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)

Attribution — You must give appropriatecredit, to ‘Josie Cole (@josiecolewrites)’, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses your use.

See ya next time 😉

If you have enjoyed this flash fiction piece, I would love to hear about it in the comments below. If you adapt this for your own creative project, feel free to post a link to your project or website.

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Fiction, Flash Fiction

Does flash fiction improve your novel writing?

This might seem like a silly question. But hang on, don’t click away just yet. Even though it might be difficult to see a direct relationship between short-form and long-form fiction, the key skills required to be successful in both worlds may be more similar than you thought.

No matter how long or short a story is, at the end of the day, it needs to be well thought out and have an appropriate amount if content. Of course a piece of flash fiction (or micro fiction) will require much less content than a novel. What matters is your ability to come up with the correct amount of content (by which I mean story events or plot) on a reliable basis. That’s the first important skill you need to have to succeed as fiction writer irrespective of word count.

The second skill you need is the ability to create a story arc to guide your reader through the narrative. No matter how long or short your story is, it will need to have a beginning, a middle, and an end…and depending on the type of story you write, it might require a twist (I definitely like a good twist). Flash fiction is an excellent practice ground for learning how to create clear and interesting story arcs. This skill is easily transferable to long-form fiction.

The third key skill you can hone as a flash fiction writer and later use to further your novel writing career is learning how to create a narrative voice. Given the extreme brevity of flash fiction, there is often little scope to introduce, nor describe, your character(s). Learning how to write in a character’s voice helps work around those limitations. Your reader can gain a lot from how a character expresses him/her/them -selves and as much as this helps save words in the realm of flash fiction, once you cross over into the realm of long-form fiction, you are likely to find this useful in avoiding overly descriptive (i.e. boring) narrative sections and info dumps that nobody wants to read.

So, there you have it. Three good reasons to start writing flash fiction immediately. I, for one, have committed to writing one piece of flash fiction per week to hone my own skills whilst I am continuing to work on my debut novel which I am hoping to self-publish at the end of 2021. I will publish my flash fiction on this blog once a week so if you’re interested in following my progress as I attempt to upskill and try some new things, keep an eye out for Friday posts.

See ya next time 😉

If you found this post helpful, are poised to try out some flash fiction, have no idea what I’m talking about, or absolutely can’t see the point of flash fiction, share your thoughts in the comments below.

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Story, World-building

Are your origin stories a waste of time?

Whoever said outlining has to be boring? Not me! As all my regular readers know, outlining is an important part of my writing process…and definitely essential for characters, and plot. On world-building, I am considering myself still an apprentice to the masters (Brandon Sanderson, I will eternally appreciate all the video lectures you put out on YouTube. I would have long given up on writing fantasy without these!) but I know for sure that I won’t get very far if I don’t develop a decent process for my world-building, too.

One of the many things I am curious about at the moment is the value of origin stories. As much as I appreciate that these can be written after the publication of a major fantasy book or series, what about writing these as part of the world-building process? You might think this is crazy-talk but I have started experimenting with this on Wattpad (as @JosieColeWrites) and the first few responses to ‘Original Magic’ are quite positive…rankings for it aren’t too shabby either.

Cover design by Josie Cole; royalty free stock image from pixabay.com

But whatever the rankings and feedback might be, at the end of the day the origin short story I am writing is not getting me any closer to finishing my actual novel – or is it?

As I see it, every piece of my story world that is revealed in my origin story naturally emerges from the needs to the origin storyline and saves me having to sit in my home office and sweat over artificial details that may never need to be mentioned in the corresponding novel. Instead, I can make sure that I come up with the important details without which my story world cannot make sense.

Brandon Sanderson has a terms for this concept of only building just enough details to make your reader believe in your story world: the hollow iceberg. Imagine the top of an iceberg being the amount of world-building that you need to put into your novel to describe to the reader where the story takes place. All the massive part of the iceberg that remains under water represents the backstory and world-building writers create to be able to work out the bits that make up the top. BUT the iceberg is hollow…because unless you have the next 20 years to get your 1st novel written, you have to learn to fake it.

So, you see? It’s through my origin story writing that I am working on becoming an excellent story-world-faker (I mean fantasy author).

See ya next time 😉

If you have any experience with ‘faking’ your world-building, feel strong objection to the concept outlined in this post, or have a better idea about what to do with origin stories (no rude suggestions please), let me know in the comments below.

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Story, Structure, Worthless Waffle, Writing Process

Can you ‘doodle’ your story in 4 simple steps?

We have already discussed the pros and cons of having an outline (or map) to help with closing plot holes, ensuring you have the right number of characters for your story, and that there are enough scenes to tell a satisfying story.

What we haven’t talked about is how to start the outline. I know how intimidating a blank page can be when your story is nothing but a vague series of snippets in your head.

To help overcome this initial anxiety, some people like morning pages. Others keep a notebook and write down bit over time until there is enough material to pull it all together. Unfortunately, neither of these methods has ever been of much help to me.

If you have had similar experiences, you might want to try the doodle method. And it goes like this:

1. Start with a blank sheet of paper (I did mine with the doodle feature in Evernote but you don’t have to be fancy). Take any pen and write ‘story doodle’ at the top of the paper.

2. That’s a good way to cheapen it up a little and reduce anxiety of ruining the page. Expect it to look terrible. Don’t pressure yourself to make this pretty! That’s very important.

3. The put the working title (if you have one) of your novel onto the centre of your paper and draw a bubble around it. Then identify the main themes of your story and write them spaced out around the centre bubble. Draw bubbles around each of these too and connect them to the centre bubble. I like to include a bubble for ‘characters’ but this can be done separately if you prefer.

4. Now start filling in information around each bubble and connect your notes with relevant bubbles (connect notes to several bubbles if applicable.

When you finish you should have something like this:

Story Doodle for the fantasy novel ‘Fearful Magic’ by Josie Cole (@WimpyWriter)

Tadaa! Your first draft outline is complete. This one took about 20 minutes, so perfect if you don’t have much time for your writing. I use my story doodle as a point of reference to help with populating my story grid and character profiles…and when I’m stuck.

See you next time 😉

If you try a story doodle or have a similar (or maybe even better) method to get a story outline started, please share your experience in the comments section below this post. I would love to hear from you.

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